During a team development session where we looked at a 360-degree diagnostic, a senior leadership team scored very low on trustworthiness. The feedback was that they were unavailable and lacked transparency.

I was asked to facilitate a strategic planning session for a national organisation. When I saw the invitation list, which had 23 people on it, I questioned the leader. My questions were about who they were and why they were there.

A friend recently told me about a meeting he once attended that had a subject of ‘goal setting’ in the email invite. There was no other information provided.

I recently took a phone call from a distraught colleague. Her supervisor had taken leave and, in their absence, Claire would be taking up the slack.

A client, Sue, decided to set all of her future calendar appointments to 30 minutes irrespective of who was involved and what the topic of discussion was. She knew this would give her 25 minutes of productive time, and 5 minutes for her colleagues to get to wherever they needed to be next.

A client once told me, ‘That’s just the way it is. It’s the nature of our business. Our stuff is dull’. So I challenged him to think of ways to make them more fun and enjoyable. He introduced yellow cards and red cards to his meetings (he’s a big soccer fan).